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Page 13 of 16
152 items found
Martha Jones_Fugitive Slave Act of 1793

Dr. Martha Jones describes the Fugitive Slave Act of 1793 and it’s effect on the Underground Railroad.

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Martha Jones_Fugitive Slave Act of 1850

Dr. Martha Jones describes the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 and it’s effect on the Underground Railroad.

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Martha Jones_Maroon Communities

Dr. Martha Jones describes maroon communities.

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Martha Jones_Migration

Dr. Martha Jones talks about defining the Underground Railroad in broader terms to include more general ideas of migration.

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Martha Jones_Personal Liberty Laws

Dr. Martha Jones describes how northern states enacted Personal Liberty Laws in response to the Fugitive Slave Act of 1793.

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Martha Jones_Underground Railroad in the South

Dr. Martha Jones talks about the Underground Railroad in the South and the use of maroon communities.

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NAACP Laying a Firm Foundation

Laying a Firm Foundation begins with the organization of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1909 in response to racial violence. The Detroit Branch of the NAACP was organized just three years later, in 1912. The founders of the Detroit Branch NAACP had a strong foundation upon which to build in fighting for political, legal, civic, and social rights, dating back to the 19th century.

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NAACP On the Front Lines

On the Front Lines focuses on the NAACP during the beginning of the 20th century. As Detroit's black middle class grows it also sparks the creation of social networks and institutions essential to the development of the Detroit NAACP.

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NAACP The Fight Continues

The Fight Continues shows how the Detroit Branch of the NAACP has stayed relevant in the 21st century by continuing the fight against marginalization, discrimination and disfranchisement.

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Reaching Out to Freedom The History of Second Baptist Church

Reaching Out to Freedom chronicles the history of Second Baptist Church of Detroit from the 1830s, as a small black church, to the present. The film highlights such vital members as George DeBaptiste, Fannie Richards, and Reverend Robert L. Bradby, Sr. For 175 years Second Baptist Church has remained one of the most significant historical sites still functioning in the world.

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© 2012 Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. All rights reserved. 315 East Warren Avenue, Detroit, MI 48201 | (313) 494-5800 | info@chwmuseum.org

This program was funded by the U.S. Department of Education Underground Railroad Educational and Cultural Program.