LINKS

UGRR - Links (Research)

LINKS

Overview

Numerous websites, historical sites, archival repositories, and other sources of information preserve the history of the Underground Railroad and the struggle against slavery. Explore these websites and historical resources to learn more about 18th and 19th century history and the extended struggle for civil rights.

Page 2 of 4

Browse Resources

Fredrick Douglass Papers at the Library of Congress

The Frederick Douglass Papers at the Library of Congress chronicles the papers of the nineteenth century African American abolitionist who escaped from slavery and then risked his own freedom by becoming an outspoken antislavery lecturer, writer, and publisher. Housed within the Library of Congress' Manuscript Division, the collection contains approximately 7,400 items (38,000 images) relating to Douglass' life as a freedom seeker, abolitionist, editor, orator, and public servant. The papers span the years 1841 to 1964, with the bulk of the material from 1862 to 1895. The collection consists of correspondences, speeches and articles by Douglass and his contemporaries, a draft of his autobiography, financial and legal papers, scrapbooks, and miscellaneous items. Included is correspondence with many prominent civil rights reformers of his day, including Susan B. Anthony, William Lloyd Garrison, Gerrit Smith, Horace Greeley, and Russell Lant, and political leaders such as Grover Clevel...

View
Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery - Resistance - and Abolition

This website, created by the Gilder Lehrman Center, provides tools to develop a deeper understanding of slavery and its role in the development of the modern world. While the Center's primary focus has been on scholarly research, it also seeks to bridge the divide between scholarship and public knowledge by opening channels of communication between the scholarly community and the wider public. The website features primary source documents, scholarly essays, visual documents, and educational materials.

View
Greater Battle Creek Underground Railroad

In 1991, the Greater Battle Creek Program, along with the Kellogg Foundation (Battle Creek, Michigan), convened a committee of Calhoun County residents and Foundation employees to erect a more significant symbol to honor the Underground Railroad history of Battle Creek. This sculpture, which was installed in October, 1993 near the original site of the Erastus Hussey House, is the nation's largest monument to the Underground Railroad.

View
Heritage Battle Creek Historical Society

Known as the location of the Kellogg Cereal Company, Battle Creek, Michigan, was also the chosen home of abolitionist Sojourner Truth and a major stop on the Underground Railroad. Originally two separate organizations, the Historical Society of Battle Creek and the Sojourner Truth Institute of Battle Creek merged in 1999 to create Heritage Battle Creek Historical Society. Heritage Battle Creek’s Research Center provides visitors with access to an extensive collection on Sojourner Truth and UGRR history. The related Kimball House Museum’s Sojourner Truth Exhibit Room contains one of the largest collection of images and artifacts about the nationally famous formerly enslaved abolition leader in the country, including her only known signature. The rich history of Battle Creek is captured in the organization’s website, which displays historical images of Battle Creek from 1830 to present.

View
In Pursuit of Freedom - Brooklyn Historical Society

In this website, the Brooklyn Historical Society, Weeksville Heritage Center, and Irondale Ensemble Project present the history of Brooklyn from 1783 to 1865. ‘In Pursuit of Freedom’ displays rare and never before seen archival materials such as newspapers, diaries, personal letters, pamphlets, city directories, census records, and broadsides to tell the story of lesser known people and places of the Underground Railroad and Brooklyn’s abolition movement. The visually stunning digital collection contains an array of interactive resources for all ages, from students to scholars and teachers.

View
Kalamazoo Public Library - The Underground Railroad

The Black History website at the Kalamazoo Public Library (KPL) in Kalamazoo, Michigan features information on antebellum American history, abolitionism, and the Civil War. The website focuses on Kalamazoo’s role in the Underground Railroad, highlighting local abolitionists such as Henry Montague and Dr. Nathan Thomas, and refers to sources from the Kalamazoo Gazette and Michigan State University press, as well as local history subject files pertaining to the Underground Railroad.

View
Kentucky Historical Society

Formed in 1836, the Kentucky Historical Society (KHS) in Frankfort, Kentucky began collecting books and printed materials in 1838. An agency of Kentucky Tourism, Arts, and Heritage Cabinet, the Society’s mission is to invite exploration of Kentucky’s diverse heritage. Its Libraries and Special Collections houses more than 90,000 published works of information on everything from the Civil War to the Underground Railroad and more.

View
Legacy of Slavery

The Legacy of Slavery Project within the Maryland State Archives seeks to preserve and promote the vast universe of experiences that have shaped the lives of Maryland’s African American population. In 2001, the Maryland State Archives began to organize research on individuals fighting against slavery, with the intention of discovering the many unknown 'heroes' of the fight for freedom. ‘Beneath the Underground’ website was created to explore the legacy of the Underground Railroad with primary source documents. The ‘Legacy of Slavery’ Archives covers information on the United States Colored Troops, slavery, the War of 1812, and the Maryland Colonization Society. The website features a section devoted to ‘Case Studies,’ summaries of available runaway ads, court documents, census data, and published material from the antebellum Maryland community with a connection to slavery.

View
Marshall Area Chamber of Commerce

The Marshall Area Chamber of Commerce in Marshall, Michigan, hosts this Michigan Underground Railroad website. Featuring the history of the ‘The Crosswhite Case,’ a narrative account of Calhoun County, as well as links to information about the UGRR stop in Marshall, MI, this website offers a wealth of Michigan historical information from 1848-1895.

View
Modern English Collection African American Electronic Text Center

The Modern English Collection at the University of Virginia includes an African American Collection. This collection spans the late eighteenth through twentieth century, with the bulk of material in the mid to late nineteenth century. Notable authors include Phillis Wheatley, Booker T. Washington, Maya Angelou, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Nat Turner. The collection features poems, speeches, Civil War letters and historical documents, all pertaining to African American textual history.

View

© 2012 Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. All rights reserved. 315 East Warren Avenue, Detroit, MI 48201 | (313) 494-5800 | info@chwmuseum.org

This program was funded by the U.S. Department of Education Underground Railroad Educational and Cultural Program.