LINKS

UGRR - Links (Research)

LINKS

Overview

Numerous websites, historical sites, archival repositories, and other sources of information preserve the history of the Underground Railroad and the struggle against slavery. Explore these websites and historical resources to learn more about 18th and 19th century history and the extended struggle for civil rights.

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Browse Resources

Moorland-Spingarn Research Center

The Moorland-Spingarn Research Center at Howard University in Washington, DC, is one of the world’s most extensive repositories documenting the global history and cultures of people of African descent. The Research Center’s website contains a dynamic and interactive exhibit of “Virtual Treasures,” including digitized resources from the period of U.S. Slavery and the Civil War to nineteenth century African American newspapers through the Civil Rights era. Of note is also the collection’s focus on materials pertaining to the African diaspora outside of the United States. Users to the website can access the MSRC catalog, and browse manuscript and archival collections.

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Network to Freedom - National Parks Service

The National Parks Service has produced an electronic educational tool called "Network to Freedom" which explores the national sites that were a part of the Underground Railroad.

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Ohio Historical Society Underground Railroad Information Station

The Ohio Historical Society has compiled an extensive list of resources that tell the history of the Underground Railroad throughout the state of Ohio. Featured on this page include links to the William H. Siebert UGRR Collection, information on the Paul Laurence Dunbar home, and information on the Rankin home.

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Pathways to Freedom in the Americas

Pathways to Freedom in the Americas is an online website that explores the escape of freedom-seekers south into Mexico and the dynamics of Afro-Mexican culture. The exhibition was inspired by the chance meeting of two women who became fast friends—Patricia Ann Talley, an African American from Michigan in the United States of America, and Candelaria Donají Mendéz Tello, an Afro-Mexican from Guerrero, México. Through their discussions, they learned about the parallel histories of their ancestors who were brought to the Americas against their will. The exhibition presents the mutually beneficial relationship between African Americans and Mexicans that is seldom discussed. Courtesy of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Task Force, Inc.

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Senator John Heinz History Center

The Senator John Heinz History Center is the largest history museum in Pennsylvania. The center features six floors of long-term and changing exhibition space, a dynamic museum-within-a-museum, and the Library & Archives, an extensive scholarly resource documenting 250 years of life in Western Pennsylvania. The Library & Archives collection includes 700,000 photographs, prints, and negatives, 40,000 books, pamphlets, and monographs, 3,500 individual archival collections of families, organizations, businesses, and industries, 600 periodical titles, 500 maps and atlases. The History Center’s new exhibition, From Slavery to Freedom highlights the history of the anti-slavery movement, the Underground Railroad, and the impact of 19th century activism on the modern quest for civil and human rights in Pittsburgh. The exhibit’s goal is to immerse visitors in the evolution of the regions African American community. The journey starts in 18th century Africa and crosses the Atlantic and ends ...

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Slavery in New York

In 2005, the New York Historical Society launched an exhibition organized by chief historian Dr. James O. Horton on the history of slavery in the state of New York. The exhibition explored the troubling history of New York slavery in two part. The first part examined slavery from the 1600s to 1827, when slavery was legally abolished in New York State. The second looked at post-emancipation life for blacks in New York from 1827 to the federal abolition of slavery in 1865.

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Slavery, Resistance, and the Underground Railroad in Michigan

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources hosts "Slavery, Resistance, and the Underground Railroad in Michigan," developed by the Michigan Freedom Trails Commission. The website features Underground Railroad lesson plans, maps, and a timeline of resistance of slavery, resistance, and freedom from 1501 to 1893. Visitors to this website can link to other Michigan historical resources.

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Sojourner Truth Virtual Institute

The Sojourner Truth Institute, located in Battle Creek, Michigan, hosts this website funded by the Michigan Humanities Council. The website consists of several relevant pages about Sojourner Truth. Considered one of the most prominent nineteenth century women in the struggle for civil and women's rights, Truth chose Battle Creek as her home for the last years of her life and continued her abolitionist activities there. The website offers links to archival materials, recommended readings, and speeches given by Sojourner Truth, along with portraits of Truth by various artists, and a quiz for children and educators.

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The African American Odyssey at the Library of Congress

Created by the Library of Congress, this website is a digital version of the exhibition of the same name, which showcased the library’s vast African American collections. Held at the Library of Congress from February 5 – May 2, 1998, the exhibition included over 240 items and was the largest black history exhibit presented by the Library at that time. Divided into nine sections from the beginnings of the Atlantic slave trade through the Civil Rights era of the twentieth century, this online exhibit allows visitors to explore some of the rich primary source materials that were on display and read the accompanying narrative.

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The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross

The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross is a six-part mini-series produced by Harvard University scholar Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr. It examines the 400-year history of African Americans, from the origins of slavery in Africa to President Obama’s election.

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© 2012 Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. All rights reserved. 315 East Warren Avenue, Detroit, MI 48201 | (313) 494-5800 | info@chwmuseum.org

This program was funded by the U.S. Department of Education Underground Railroad Educational and Cultural Program.