LINKS

UGRR - Links (Research)

LINKS

Overview

Numerous websites, historical sites, archival repositories, and other sources of information preserve the history of the Underground Railroad and the struggle against slavery. Explore these websites and historical resources to learn more about 18th and 19th century history and the extended struggle for civil rights.

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Browse Resources

The Church in the Southern Black Community

This compilation of printed texts from the libraries at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill traces how southern African Americans experienced and transformed Protestant Christianity into the central institution of community life. The website focuses, through narratives and observations by other African American authors, on how the black community adapted evangelical Christianity, making it a metaphor for freedom, community, and personal survival. Comprised mostly of books, slave narratives, some pamphlets and journal articles, the collection also includes early twentieth century assessments of black scholars on the Church's role in American history and society.

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The John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University Libraries

The John Hope Franklin Research Center is a repository for African and African-American studies documentation and an educational outreach division of the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Duke University. Founded in November 1995 with the support of its namesake, the distinguished historian John Hope Franklin, the Franklin Research Center seeks to collect, preserve, and promote the use of library materials bearing on the history of Africa and people of African descent. The Franklin Research Center is committed to preserving and making available pertinent printed and manuscript materials for the use of scholars, academic researchers, and others. The Duke University Library, in partnership with the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, North Carolina State, and North Carolina Central also houses several digital collections pertaining to African American history.

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The Rankin House

The Rankin House in Ripley, Ohio is a National Historic Landmark and was a significant site of the Underground Railroad. Built in 1828, Rev. John Rankin’s home became a key location for food, shelter, and information for freedom seekers escaping southern slavery. The historic site contains the original woodwork and several of Rev. Rankin’s personal items. Owned by the Ohio Historical Society, this website provides detailed information about Rev. John Rankin the abolitionist, as well as educational tour information.

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The Revised Dred Scott Case Collection

Located at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, the Dred Scott Case Collection, which went online in 2000, was the first significant digital library project undertaken by the Washington University Libraries. A partnership between the Missouri State Archives, Washington University faculty members, and the Washington University Libraries, the original digital collection brought together legal materials documenting the Dred Scott case, a prominent legal battle regarding slaves’ status in the decade leading up to the Civil War. In 2007, the collection was expanded from eighty-five to one hundred and eleven documents, over 400 pages of text. In addition, the collection is now a full-text, searchable resource that represents the full case history of the Dred Scott Case.

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The Underground Railroad - Michigan Historical Center's Time Traveler

Produced by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, which manages the Michigan Historical Museum, this website is a kids-friendly internet space that allows children to learn about the Underground Railroad and its activities in Michigan. The website features a small timeline and historical overview of Ramptown, along with the stories of freedom seekers such as the Crosswhites, who arrived safely in Canada with the help of Michigan Underground Railroad activists. There is also a Teacher's Resource Guide.

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UGRR Society of Cass County

The Underground Railroad Society of Cass County, Michigan is a 501c3 nonprofit organization located in Cass County, Michigan, that resulted from a group of area residents, historians and community activists meeting over several months in 2008-2009 to discuss the African American experience in Cass County. The group formalized and organized a website to share insights on the rich history of the UGRR in Cass County. The Cass County Underground Railroad Society website provides an overview of the history of the Underground Railroad, with particular emphasis on its activity in the western area of Michigan. The website provides links to further readings about the unique history of Cass County and its Quaker farmers and free blacks role who helped in UGRR efforts. UGRR maps and timelines are featured on the website. The site also features information on the restoration of the James E. Bonnie House, a site of 19th century UGRR activity.

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Uncle Toms Cabin Special Collection at the University of Virginia Alderman Library

The Alderman Library, located at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia, features this website about the cultural history of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin and antebellum-era American literature. Bringing together documents from 1830 to 1930 that both preceded and responded to the classic work, the website provides a vast amount of primary source material such as sound clips, illustrations, manuscripts, and relevant legal cases. These documents are also supplemented by a section of interpretive materials, which features essays by a dozen scholars written to provide ways of exploring and understanding the primary source materials. The website also includes an interactive timeline, lesson plans for teachers, and student projects.

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Underground Railroad Freedom Center

The UGRR Freedom Center in Cincinnati, Ohio is a state of the art educational center with a website funded by the U.S. Department of that offers extensive online historical content, including timelines, maps, lesson plans, and oral histories. In addition to exploring the history of the UGRR using primary sources and narratives, and the significance of historical figures such as Henry ‘Box’ Brown, Margaret Garner, and John Rankin, the website also features an online exhibit of documents relating to Fredrick Douglass. Within the website’s Teacher Resources section, one can explore a variety of educational resources regarding the Underground Railroad and the broader story of America's struggle for freedom. The website also features a link to the Freedom Stations Program, a national outreach program linking historic Underground Railroad websites, research centers, university library collections, museums, and historic preservation efforts through the National Underground Railroad Freedom...

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Voices from the Days of Slavery Digital Collection

“Voices from the Days of Slavery,” a digital collection at the Library of Congress, consists of seven hours of recorded interviews that took place between 1932 and 1975 in nine southern states. The interviewees, twenty-three in all, were born between 1823 and the early 1860s. In these recordings, the interviewees discuss how they felt about slavery, slaveholders, coercion of the enslaved, their families, and freedom. Each interview has been cataloged individually based on subject, names, places, and song titles discussed. Also featuring an image gallery and biographies of the interviewees, this oral history collection is a highly valuable research tool.

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© 2012 Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. All rights reserved. 315 East Warren Avenue, Detroit, MI 48201 | (313) 494-5800 | info@chwmuseum.org

This program was funded by the U.S. Department of Education Underground Railroad Educational and Cultural Program.